Digging Deep To Find The Future

She wasn’t a chatty kind of girl.  Second grade seemed a little rough.  It’s easy to think of childhood as a stress-free time.  After all, what is there to worry about?  No bills, no need to buy food for the table or put clothes on the backs of others, very little health issues.   But when we take time to look through their eyes, children have a lot of stress…fitting in, making grades, staying out of trouble, avoiding drama… Elementary School is a society with all kinds of human interaction issues.

So “T” was just going through life on, what seemed to be, autopilot.  She did the tasks of the school day and went home.  No conversation.  Very little interaction.

The perception among some was that she was “behind”; “high need”; “anti-social”.

But her Lunch Buddy knew she was in there.  She found her during reading time.  Her eyes danced, her finger followed every word and she read like a seasoned orator.  She loved books about people, heroes, biographies, history.

One day “T” and her buddy were sharing a book about careers.

One would expect a second grade child to mutter or mumble a simple answer when asked by her buddy, “What do you want to be when you grow up?”  But “T” did not.  She simply looked up from the words on the page when the question was asked and announced, “Anthropologist.”

WOW!  The Lunch Buddy smiled at the answer, thinking to herself that she probably didn’t know what an anthropologist was even when she was in high school much less second grade.

What do anthropologists do?  They study people, human behaviors, societies, tribes… past and present.  Today anthropologists work with corporations to study business cultures and how people work together.  A lost art!

In southwest Missouri a little girl is sitting at a table during lunch with a loving mentor who is sparking a big change in the world of human interaction…one hug, one book, one visit at a time.

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